Bindheimite

Formula: Pb2Sb5+2O7
Antimonate, stibiconite group
Specific gravity: 4.6 to 5.6
Hardness: 4 to 4½
Streak: White, yellowish white
Colour: Yellow, yellow-brown, brown, white, grey, greenish; colourless to yellow and brown in transmitted light
Solubility: Dissolves in nitric acid, leaving a residue of antimonic oxide; also dissolves in hydrochloric acid, leaving a residue of lead chloride.
Environments:

Hydrothermal environments

Bindheimite is a secondary mineral occurring in the oxidised zones of antimony-bearing lead deposits; it is a frequent oxidation product of lead-antimony-sulphosalts. Associated minerals include galena, pyrite, chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite, jamesonite, bournonite, zinkenite, cerussite, plumbojarosite, argentojarosite, minium, massicot, quartz, baryte, calcite and dolomite.
Bindheimite may alter to massicot, and pseudomorphically replaces jamesonite, tetrahedrite, galena, bournonite, and zinkenite. At Kintore, Broken Hill, New South Wales, Australia, bindheimite is very rare, but has been found in massive galena in garnet sandstone.

At Kingsgate, New England district, New South Wales, Australia, bindheimite has been found as a coating on a quartz crystal

At the Mineral Hill field, central New South Wales, Australia, bindheimite forms by oxidation of a galena-tetrahedrite assemblage, and occurs associated with massicot, osarizawaite, pyromorphite, quartz, azurite, malachite, cerussite, plumbojarosite, plumbogummite and kaolinite.

At the Platt, Comet and Adelaide mines, Dundas, Tasmania, Australia, bindheimite occurs intermixed with crocoite.

At the ShangriLa Pb-Ag-Au-Cu mine at Kimberley, Western Australia, bindheimite is a secondary mineral in the oxidised zone. Bindheimite-malachite boxworks occur on some specimens, and may have formed after tetrahedrite.

At the Northampton lead-copper field. Western Australia, bindheimite has been found replacing tetrahedrite in a cerussite-rich matrix, intergrown with cerussite.

At Arm O'Grain, Caldbeck Fells, Cumbria, England, bindheimite has been found as powdery crusts in cavities in quartz veins.

At Balliway Rigg, Caldbeck Fells, Cumbria, England, bindheimite occurs as powdery encrustations in cavities in a quartz-galena matrix, with cerussite, caledonite, leadhillite and malachite. It is quite common in cavities in quartz veins near partially oxidised galena.

At Brae Fell mine, Caldbeck Fells, Cumbria, England, coatings of bindheimite, often associated with cerussite and sometimes with anglesite, are common in cavities in quartz, mainly from the lower dump.

At the Driggith and Sandbed mines, Caldbeck Fells, Cumbria, England, bindheimite is reasonably common in cavities in quartz veins containing partly oxidised galena and cerussite.

At Ingray Gill, Caldbeck Fells, Cumbria, England, powdery bindheimite is an occasional associate of partly oxidised galena and cerussite.

At Red Gill Mine, Caldbeck Fells, Cumbria, England, earthy coatings of bindheimite are common in cavities generated by the oxidation of galena. It is commonly associated with cerussite, anglesite, susannite and leadhillite.

At Short Grain, Caldbeck Fells, Cumbria, England, thin, earthy bindheimite crusts line many of the cavities in quartz and baryte that were once occupied by galena. It may occur with almost any of the white lead minerals and is most often associated with cerussite. It is probably formed by leaching of lead during the oxidation of galena, which appears to be the principal host for antimony in the vein.

At Silver Gill, Caldbeck Fells, Cumbria, England, bindheimite has been found as a powdery crust in cavities in quartz veins containing partly oxidised galena, cerussite and pyromorphite.

Common impurities: As,Bi,Ca,Fe,Na